Tiflológico Museum in Madrid, Spain

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Most museums offer strictly visual experiences; in fact touching the art is usually off limits. But the Tiflológico Museum (Typhlological Museum) in Madrid was created to give visually impaired people a chance to experience the masterpieces of art and architecture that sighted people may take for granted. 

Visitors to this museum use their sense of touch to feel and explore some of the world’s most important monuments and works of art, from the Colosseum in Rome to the ancient Venus of Willendorf figurine. Specially crafted models of famous monuments, historic buildings, paintings, sculptures, and textile art line the place. The pieces are made by blind or visually impaired artists, created with vivid saturated tones and raised details.

The Typhlological Museum (the word “Typhlós” comes from the greek Τυφλός meaning blind) was inaugurated in 1992 by ONCE, the National Organization of the Spanish Blind. However the project’s origins date as far back as the 19th century, when collections called Museums of Objects were exhibited by Madrid’s national associations for the deaf and blind. The museum also displays devices uses to aid the blind throughout history.

Madrid’s Museum for the Blind

Most museums offer strictly visual experiences; in fact touching the art is usually off limits. But the Tiflológico Museum (Typhlological Museum) in Madrid was created to give visually impaired people a chance to experience the masterpieces of art and architecture that sighted people may take for granted.

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